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Table 2 Summary of included randomized controlled trial

From: Is platelet-rich plasma an ideal biomaterial for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Authors/publish year Population differences Repair type Outcomes measured Relevant findings
Castricini et al. 2011 [25] Included any full-thickness tear Double row Subjective: Constant scores
Imaging: MRI at 16 months
No difference in constant scores and retear rates between groups
Randelli et al. 2011 [31] Included any full-thickness tear Single row Subjective: Constant, UCLA, SST
Imaging: MRI 12 months
Significant improvement in constant, UCLA, and SST in PRPþ group
No difference in outcomes at final follow-up
Gumina et al. 2012 [27] Included only large tears
Excluded partial tears, massive tears, traumatic tears
Single row Subjective: Constant, ST
Imaging: MRI at 12 months
Significantly increased constant score in the PRPþ group, but no difference in change from pre- to postoperatively
Weber et al. 2012 [35] Included any arthroscopic rotator cuff repair Single row Subjective: ASES, UCLA, SST, VAS
Imaging: MRI at 12 months ROM
No difference in outcome scores or ROM between groups
No difference in retear rates between groups
Jo et al. 2013 [28] Included only large tears (> 3 cm sagittal length)
Included 4 partial repairs
Double row Subjective: ASES, CLA, Constant, SST, DASH, SPADI
Imaging: MRI or CTA at 9 months
No difference between the two groups on the VAS for pain, ROM, muscle strength, overall satisfaction, and function
The retear rate of the PRP group was significantly lower
Ruiz-Moneo et al. 2013 [33] Included tendon retraction and fatty infiltration, smokers Double row Subjective: UCLA
Imaging: MRA at 12 months
No difference in UCLA scores between groups
No difference in retear rates between groups
Malavolta et al. 2014 [30] Included only tears < 3 cm in sagittal length Single row Subjective: Constant, UCLA
Imaging: MRI at 3, 6, and 12 months
No differences in constant or UCLA scores between groups
No difference in retear rates between groups
Sánchez Márquez et al. 2011 [34] Included only repairable large tears > 5
Excluded subscapularis tears
Single row Subjective: Constant
Imaging: MRA at 12 months
No differences in constant or UCLA scores between groups
No difference in retear rates between groups
Rodeo et al. 2012 [32] Included full-thickness tears, age > 40 years Double row Subjective: ASES, L’Insalata
Imaging: US at 12 weeks
No difference in outcome scores between groups
No difference in retear rates between groups
Flury et al. 2016 [26] A complete rotator cuff tear Double row Subjective: Constant-Murley score, ASES, OSS
Imaging: MRI or US at 12 months
No significantly improved function at 3, 6, and 24 months after arthroscopic repair compared with control patients receiving ropivacaine
Holtby et al. 2016 [9] Full-thickness and partial-thickness tear Single row and double row Subjective: VAS, CMS, ASES, ShortWORC
Imaging: MRI at 6 months
A short-term effect on perioperative pain
No significant impact on patient-oriented outcome measures or retear rate
Pandey et al. 2016 [10] Medium-sized to large cuff tears Single row Subjective: VAS, CMS, ASES, UCLA
Imaging: US at 24 months
Retear in the PRP group was significantly lower, significant improvement in constant, UCLA score
No difference in ASES score
Jo et al. 2015 [29] Medium to large rotator cuff tears Double row Subjective: Constant score, VAS, ASES, UCLA, SST, SPADI scores
Imaging: MRI at 12 months
A decreased retear rate of the supraspinatus, but not the speed of healing
No significantly improved function scores at and 12 months after arthroscopic