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Table 2 Univariate analysis a

From: Associated tears of the lateral meniscus in anterior cruciate ligament injuries: risk factors for different tear patterns

Variable Group
‘No tear’ ‘Minor tear’ ‘Major tear’ P value
Gender     0.002b
 Female 51 (43%) 23 (40%) 4 (11%)  
 Male 69 (58%) 35 (60%) 33 (89%)  
Age (years) 28.7 ± 10.1 27.6 ± 10.0 25.1 ± 9.3 0.086
Age groups (years)     
 <30 71 (59%) 42 (72%) 30 (81%) 0.026c
 >30 49 (41%) 16 (28%) 7 (19%)  
Height (cm) 173.7 ± 9.2 (172.1–175.4) 175.2 ± 8.7 (172.9–177.4) 177.8 ± 8.8 (174.9–180.7) 0.052
Weight (kg) 74.4 ± 15.4 (71.6–77.2) 74.6 ± 13.6 (71.1–78.2) 79.8 ± 16.5 (74.3–85.3) 0.233
BMI (kg/m2) 24.6 ± 4.7 (23.8–25.5) 24.4 ± 5.0 (23.1–25.7) 25.1 ± 4.0 (23.8–26.4) 0.480
BMI groups (kg/m2)     0.590
 <24.9 76 (63%) 42 (72%) 21 (57%)  
 25–29.9 34 (28%) 13 (22%) 13 (35%)  
 >30 10 (8%) 3 (5%) 3 (8%)  
Type of injury     0.728
 High-impact sports 81 (68%) 36 (62%) 28 (76%)  
 Low-impact sports 12 (10%) 6 (10%) 3 (8%)  
 Not sports related 27 (23%) 16 (28%) 6 (16%)  
Mechanism of injury     <0.001d
 Non-contact 109 (91%) 43 (74%) 17 (46%)  
 Contact 11 (9%) 15 (26%) 20 (54%)  
  1. aContinuous variables are shown as mean ± standard deviation (95% confidence interval), categorical variables are shown as number of patients and percentages per group.
  2. b Post hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between ‘no tear’ and ‘major tear’ (P < 0.001) and between ‘minor tear’ and ‘major tear’ (P = 0.002).
  3. c Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between ‘no tear’ and ‘major tear’ (P = 0.015).
  4. d Post hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between ‘no tear’ and ‘minor tear’ (P = 0.006), between ‘no tear’ and ‘major tear’ (P < 0.001), and between ‘minor tear’ and ‘major tear’ (P = 0.009).